Author Archives: Kevin Bronsdijk


Azure Resource Groups

Azure Resource Groups

The new Azure Portal is somewhat different. I must admit that I wasn’t a big fan of the new format initially. It’s looking somewhat clunky and not very efficient when it comes to screen real state at first. However, over time I started to like the new Portal more and more. You have to spend some time exploring it.

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Azure Automation Schedule Jobs

Azure Automation Schedule Jobs

This post is a follow-up post that covered a brief introduction to Microsoft Azure Automation and can be found here.

Within this post, I will cover how to publish a workbook, schedule the execution of workbooks, enable detailed logging, and a quick view at the dashboard.

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Microsoft Azure Automation 101

Microsoft Azure Automation 101

Before we get started it’s important to know where Microsoft Azure Automation fits in the available automation options for Windows Azure.

Microsoft Azure Automation is a new feature within the Microsoft Azure Platform which allows Cloud Administrators to centrally manage automation assets (scripts, global variables) and schedule automation tasks, with a main focus on manual, long-running, error-prone, and frequently repeated tasks (Release resources, Manage backups, Monitoring etc.).

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PowerShell – Desired State Configuration

PowerShell - Desired State Configuration

Probably one of the most exciting features included within PowerShell 4 is the option to create configuration scripts, also known as DSC. Yes, this is something new – unless you are familiar with Chef and Puppet. And no, this isn’t the same as executing a large provisioning script.

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Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 3

Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 3

This is The third and last part of the Detecting T-SQL code smells series. Within this post I will cover how the solution can be customized by adding new validation rules

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Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 2

Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 2

For the second part of this series, I’m relying on a TSQL Code Smells Finder hosted on Codeplex.  The solution consists out of 3 files (one PowerShell script, a text file containing a list with possible errors and a whitelist file) and build within PowerShell.

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Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 1

Detecting T-SQL code smells – Part 1

When moving a new SQL server database into production or taking over maintenance duties, you might want to perform some audit’s first. Audit reports make it easy to identify issues and rais additional questions.

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